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Friday, September 13th, 2019

 

TECHNOLOGY: A Swiss house built by robots (PHOTOS)

A Swiss house built by robots promises to revolutionize the construction industry By QUARTZ Erecting a new building ranks among the most inefficient, polluting activities humans undertake. The construction sector is responsible for nearly 40% of the world’s total energy consumption and CO2 emissions, according to a UN global survey (pdf). A consortium of Swiss researchers has one answer to the problem: working with robots. The proof of concept comes in the form of the DFAB House, celebrated as the first habitable building designed and planned using a choreography of digital fabrication methods. TheRead More


Wikipedia’s Article of the Day September 14, 2019: Thomas F. Mulledy

Thomas F. Mulledy Thomas F. Mulledy (1794–1860) was a Catholic priest from Virginia and a prominent leader of the American Jesuits. He twice served as President of Georgetown College in Washington, D.C., where he undertook a significant building campaign. After his first presidency, he was appointed provincial superior of the Jesuit Maryland province in 1837. The following year, Mulledy executed the sale of 272 slaves owned by the Maryland Jesuits in order to relieve the province’s mounting debts. After an outcry from his fellow Jesuits over the immorality of theRead More


The 9/11 Memorial: Where the Towers Fell

The 9/11 Memorial: Where the Towers Fell The 9/11 Memorial is both a tourist destination and a graveyard. How do we interact with it? Read more: https://ift.tt/30eHwz6 “Footprint” was directed by Sara Newens. It is part of The Atlantic Selects, an online showcase of short documentaries from independent creators, curated by The Atlantic. === THE ATLANTIC SELECTS Where the Towers Fell Sep 11, 2019 | 777 videos Video by Sara Newens Memorials are multidimensional, dichotomous spaces. They exist somewhere between presence and memory. They are built for the collective andRead More


How Black Americans Were Robbed of Their Land

How Black Americans Were Robbed of Their Land Over the course of the 20th century, black Americans have lost approximately 12 million acres of land. This mass land dispossession—a war waged by deed of title, which has affected 98 percent of black farmers—can only be called theft, says Atlantic writer Vann R. Newkirk II in a new documentary. The Scott family, from Mound Bayou, Mississippi, can trace their land ownership back to 1938, when the family’s agriculturally gifted patriarch began amassing more than 1,000 acres. By the late ‘80s, theRead More


Researchers discover electric eel which emits 860 volts (VIDEO)

‘Electrophorus voltai,’ one of the two newly discovered electric eel species. Newly identified electric eel is the most powerful ever found, say scientists (CNN)A newly-identified eel living in the Amazon basin can deliver record-breaking electric jolts, according to a study published Tuesday. Researchers at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History have identified two new species of electric eel in the Amazon rainforest, tripling the known number of electric eel species.One of the new species — Electrophorus voltai — can discharge up to 860 volts of electricity, significantly more than the 650 voltsRead More


Researchers discover electric eel which emits 860 volts (VIDEO)

‘Electrophorus voltai,’ one of the two newly discovered electric eel species. Newly identified electric eel is the most powerful ever found, say scientists (CNN)A newly-identified eel living in the Amazon basin can deliver record-breaking electric jolts, according to a study published Tuesday. Researchers at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History have identified two new species of electric eel in the Amazon rainforest, tripling the known number of electric eel species.One of the new species — Electrophorus voltai — can discharge up to 860 volts of electricity, significantly more than the 650 voltsRead More


Uganda’s newest tourist attraction is Idi Amin

An image of dictator Idi Amin is displayed at the Uganda Museum in Kampala. (Uganda Museum)  KAMPALA, Uganda (Los Angeles Times) — Four years ago, researchers working to preserve Ugandan history came across an old metal filing cabinet at the state broadcasting company and pried it open. Inside were some 70,000 negatives. Their main subject was Idi Amin, the notorious dictator who ruled Uganda during the 1970s and oversaw the killings of as many as 300,000 people. In one image, he wears an immaculate suit and stands before a cluster ofRead More


SURVEILLANCE: Chinese police sniff out a fugitive — literally — in the case of the telltale hot pot

Screen capture of CCTV footage using a face recognition system in Beijing, China. (Gilles Sabrié/Gilles Sabri /For The Washington Post) By The Washington Post BEIJING — China’s rapidly evolving surveillance technologies have snared their share of fugitives in recent years. Most of these cases have involved facial recognition cameras, which can detect individual facial features regardless of glasses, hats or masks. There were the 80-odd wanted suspects picked out of crowds of tens of thousands of fans at concerts by Jacky Cheung, a legendary Hong Kong pop star. In AprilRead More


SURVEILLANCE: Chinese police sniff out a fugitive — literally — in the case of the telltale hot pot

Screen capture of CCTV footage using a face recognition system in Beijing, China. (Gilles Sabrié/Gilles Sabri /For The Washington Post) By The Washington Post BEIJING — China’s rapidly evolving surveillance technologies have snared their share of fugitives in recent years. Most of these cases have involved facial recognition cameras, which can detect individual facial features regardless of glasses, hats or masks. There were the 80-odd wanted suspects picked out of crowds of tens of thousands of fans at concerts by Jacky Cheung, a legendary Hong Kong pop star. In AprilRead More


NY finds $1B in hidden transfers by family behind OxyContin

Cars pass Purdue Pharma headquarters Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, in Stamford, Conn. For months, the judge overseeing national litigation over the opioids crisis urged all sides to reach a settlement that could end thousands of lawsuits filed by state and local governments. But the chaotic developments this week in the case against OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma underscore how difficult that goal is. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) NEW YORK (Associated Press) — The family that owns OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma used Swiss and other hidden accounts to transfer $1 billion toRead More